Peas – Varieties I’m Growing in 2014

In keeping with the Bean and Potato posts I wrote, I thought I would keep up the trend, and write one about the Peas I am growing this year.

Sugar Snap (Edible Pod)– sown April 12 inside, and June 7th outside.

“Heavy Yields with a deliciously sweet flavor and crispy texture characterize this All America Award winning variety. The 6′ vines provide an abundance of scrumptious 3″ pods, which are completely edible. Support with netting or a trellis. Tastes great raw, stir-fried, steamed or in salads.”

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Wando – Sown April 12 inside, and June 7th outside. I chose this because of it’s description:

“An all around excellent pea plant, yielding 3″ pods with 7-8 delicious peas per pod. Tolerant of both heat and cold, this is an ideal variety for early sowing. Enjoy the bounty of peas from with vigorous grower.”

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Laxton’s Progress – Sown May 7th  inside and June 7th outside.
I chose these because I wanted to compare the more dwarf-type peas to the more vigorous ones like Wando. However, I have to say that there is something slightly more satisfying about nearly 6 feet tall pea plants. Unless these ones taste amazing, I will probably not grow them in the large garden next year. I do think they would fit in well in a small backyard container where you are short on space. Here is McKenzie Seeds description: “One of the earliest maturing peas, with a dwarf habit. Produces 4-5″ pods with 8-10 large, sweet peas. Good yielder.”

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Sugar Sprint – sown June 7th outside, with a successional planting planned for the end of June.
I picked these up last year for my small, mostly container based backyard and just never got around to planting them. The description reads: “A bush type habit that is wilt resistant. Can be grown in small spaces or containers. The pods offer a delicious taste and are very flavorful. Ideal when eaten fresh from the garden, steamed or in stir-fries.”

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Mr. Big – sown June 7th outside, with a successional planting planned for the end of June.
These were chosen solely based on their name, but their description also sounds great. I’m excited to try these: “High yielding variety of giant dark green pods 4-5″ with 9-10 delicious sweet tasting peas per pod. The large strong vines (3-4′) do not need any support, however, trellis may be used to keep the pods from touching the ground and easier to pick. An excellent resistance to race 1 fusarium wilt.”

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Lincoln Homesteader – sown June 7th outside, with a successional planting planned for the end of June.
I picked these up because they are available from nearly every seed company, and are the standard go-to pea of most old time gardeners. This package is from Mr. Fothergill’s, an their description is: “Delicious green pods containing very sweet, tasty peas; A favorite heirloom that produces heavy crops!”

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Alaska – I haven’t sown these just yet. In fact, I just bought them yesterday, but I hope to have them in the dirt by the end of June. I will likely save most of them for next Spring. They are described as: “A very early and very heavy yielder. 6-8 sweet peas in 2-3″ pods. Disease, wilt and cold resistant. Prolong the harvest season with successive sowings every two weeks until mid-June or sow with mid and late season varieties to ensure a continuous supply of fresh peas.”

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So far I am REALLY impressed with the Wando and Sugar Snap inside the greenhouse. They are as tall as I am and just starting to set flowers. There is really no way to distinguish the two, other than knowing that I put the seeds in those places. The Laxton’s Progress peas that were sown on May 7th, are not tall, but they are setting some flowers also. I will be interested to see the difference in taste and flavor. All of the outside planted peas are just starting to poke through the dirt, so it will be exciting to watch them all grow.

Part of my plan of planting so many peas, is that there will be hope of some making it home for cooking/freezing. When I grow only a small number of plants, they only ever make it into my mouth.

As with the beans, I will try and do a pea-specific update, but until then, you can follow along in the regular greenhouse garden updates.

 

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